H-Comp Review

alHCmpReviewHaving worked with various compressors throughout one’s career, one comes to learn the various characteristics of these different units. Some are known for aggression, Some are known for their lush body, and others can go from clean to aggressive in no time. This plugin aims to provide you with the “best of all worlds”.

The H-Comp aka Hybrid Compressor is not an emulation of a classic compressor but instead it takes the harmonic distortion characteristics of vintage equipment from the likes of SSL, API and Neve and merges them with the diversity of signal processing within the digital realm.

Lets get started shall we…

Analog

This knob provides us with various types of harmonic distortion emulated from their respective hardware counterparts. For a visual test, I placed the Test Oscillator emitting a 1000Hz sine wave at the first insert, followed by an H-Comp, and then the Blue Cat Frequency Analyzer. This will give us a better visual representation of what is taking place. At the end of the day it is all about the sound.

Starting with the “Off” position.

H-Comp 001 Analog OffAs we can see from the screenshot above …this compressor can be relatively clean with minimal distortion added to the signal.

Analog 1

H-Comp 002 Analog 1

Here we can see a somewhat smooth distortion pattern, with slight low frequency boost. Harmonics at the 2kHz, and 3.5kHz region appear to be most prevalent in this mode. Playback through this mode was quite clean with little to no audible distortion. This led me to believe that this mode appears to be emulating the Neve.

Analog 2

H-Comp 002 Analog 2

Based on analyses above, Analog 2 appears to be quite similar to Analog 1 with the exception of some faint white noise in the upper end of the spectrum. Harmonics exist on the 2Khz and 3.5kHz frequencies with an inversion in their amplitude. In my listening test, placing the H-Comp on entire mix while in this mode gave me a sound most reminiscent of the SSL 4000G console. The mix became a little more solid, while elements like cymbals came across with a gritty but gentle distortion.

Analog 3

H-Comp 004 Analog 3

This is the most aggressive out of the three as you can see from the image above. This one is not playing around. As you switch to this mode, you can instantly hear a change in the tonality of the sound. This mode appears to give the mix more dept. Harmonics are mainly within the high mid frequency range.

Analog 4

H-Comp 005 Analog 4

Distortion in this mode was lush sounding with a slight distortion present on the tail end of notes. You can also see a decrease in the lower mid range to lower frequencies.

It is amazing to think that in the past most manufacturers were aiming for minimal THD (total harmonic distortion) in their designs. Now in this day and age it is considered the pinnacle of  their establishments. The term “in-the-box” is often associated with terms such as “sterile” and flat sounding. Many engineers believe till this day that these consoles add the magic touch necessary to give the mix more life. This plugin claims to provide the best of all worlds and I have to say it is definitely proves to be a hybrid.

On to the other stuff…

Ignoring parameters commonly known to the compressor, we have a knob called “Punch” and it does exactly that. Turning the knob clock-wise causes the compressor to let more transients through, regardless of the attack time set.

We have Sync control, which allows us to adjust the release time of the compressor based on the tempo (beats per minute) of the song, Great when you’re going for accuracy. And of course you are also provided the old-school with the option to have it work in milliseconds (MS).

We have a Mix knob enabling us to parallel compress audio on the fly without having the need to create a separate aux channel strip to buss a copy of the signal to. Very handy indeed.

To provide icing on the cake, Waves have built a limiter right into the H-Comp.

In another one of my tests, I placed the H-Comp on my Drum Sub Master and hit play on the transport. It provided instant gratification before even tweaking the knobs. Adjusting it to a medium attack and a short release, I was able to get a lot of punch out of the kit. While listening I watched the channel strip meter in Logic and adjusted the Output knob on the H-Comp, bypassing and un-bypassing the plugin to make sure that I was not being fooled by the perceived loudness that normally takes place in automatic make-up gain situations. I was not fooled at all, though to be expected, the plugin did boost the signal ever so slightly.

Having said that, the sound coming through the H-Comp was noticeably fuller and richer in comparison to the dry signal. Using Analog 4, I was able to hear more ghost notes from the drum kit. My next move was to try it out on the bass, normally 1176 territory, then again the 1176 sounds great on just about anything (but you probably should not go about putting over your entire mix). The H-Comp shined when inserted on the bass, especially when cranking the Output knob. Of course the increased gain was compensated for by using the stock “Gain” plugin provided with Logic Pro. I proceeded to test out the different Analog modes and modes 2, 3, and 4, shined like silk. Indeed this plugin has earned my Editor’s Choice Award. Go ahead and try it out for yourself, I doubt that you will be sorry.

Alexander Lindo is a singer-songwriter, producer, audio engineer, technology enthusiast, Apple Certified Pro and Pro Tools Certified Operator. If you enjoyed this article don’t forget to like me on Facebook, follow me on TwitterGoogle Plus. When you are done, please check out my music. Thank you for your continued support.

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